Image Image Image Image Image
© All Year Garden 2010

WordPress Theme – Aware by © Themewich 

Scroll to Top

To Top

garden maintenance

cure for the unrelenting blah

In anticipation of good weather I’m already planning some gardening activities, there are summer bulbs to be planted and perennials beds to be cleaned up for spring.

Plodding through day after day bullied by cloudy skies and bone chilling temperatures, I almost forgot how beautiful the garden is, how exhilarating it is to feel it warm up and try to guess the fresh growth right under the soil surface, almost ready to breach it. Read more…

how to grow a wildflower meadow

So, you have your heart set on creating a wildflower meadow and those packages of mixed seeds beckon you from the stands, irresistibly. You picture wild flowers and the thought of perpetual, zero maintenance beauty springs to mind. Wild flower meadows are not low maintenance, at least not for the first five or six years, while they are getting established. Read more…

spring cleaning your perennial garden

Spring cleaning shows off your garden at its best, allowing all the fresh shoots plenty of air and sunlight to develop with amazing speed. Of course if you have a perennial garden Read more…

happy valentine’s day

The hellebores are spoiling me as always by blooming unbelievably early. This year they set a record and bloomed in January. Read more…

what feeds your garden

Garden bloggers are always eager to share pictures of beautiful flowers and bountiful fruit, but not so much of the foundation that makes them possible.

This is a picture of six week old compost made possible by an overabundance of weeds and a lot of rain. It turned into rich, beautiful, smell free organic matter that will feed the plants and improve the soil naturally and long term.

The gardener’s best friends, the earth worms, showed up diligently and in large numbers, which makes me happy in the knowledge that the compost is healthy and top quality.

This is not the usual way to make compost, I know, but the fact that it doesn’t contain kitchen scraps and paper makes it possible to create an acceptable and non-offensive compost pile in an inconspicuous corner of your yard and still get all the benefits of replenishing the soil organically.

I am looking forward to feeding the garden with this. One doesn’t usually get enthusiastic about fresh soil, but I’m sure my gardening friends will understand.

cup of joe for your plants?

Do you want a great organic fertilizer that will boost your vegetable production and encourage profuse blooming for your roses? Sprinkle used coffee grounds on your flower beds. Coffee grounds are an abundant source of nitrogen and are perfect for heavy feeders that don’t mind a slightly acidic soil (among those you can count pretty much all vegetables, roses, rhododendrons, azaleas, etc.) Some organic tomato growers swear by this fertilizer for its capacity to boost production and eliminate late blight.

If you can get a large quantity of coffee grounds they make a spectacular soft chocolate brown mulch. Hostas and lilies will particularly benefit from coffee for slug and snail protection. Coffee is such an effective fertilizer than 1″ of coffee mulch equals 1 foot of coarse straw. You can also work the grounds into the potting soil for thriving container plantings.

Be careful, it is an equal opportunity feeder, so your plants will benefit but the weeds will too. Plants also like brewed coffee at room temperature, don’t forget to treat your house plants to a cup of Joe every now and then.

Coffee grounds and tea bags decompose very quickly in your compost pile and improve its nitrogen content.

On a completely unrelated note, the plant in the picture is a Roseraie de l’Hay rugosa rose that I bought from Pickering Nurseries and planted this spring.

Garden care for the fall

At this time your garden is probably expressing the melancholy state of the growing season’s end, when fruit is ripening, perennials go dormant, and the rich abundance of summer starts to fade. Fortunately there are still plenty of faithful fall favorites to brighten up the day, such as mums and stone crops, and this blue ground cover beauty. In order to keep a bright outlook on gardening, there will be much work to be done at the beginning of fall. Here’s the list:

– clean, deadhead, weed (again!). Get rid of all the spent plants and anything that already turned brown.

– don’t forget to water, the garden is tired already, you don’t want it wasting

– gather seeds and fruit, there will be plenty of them

– don’t feed! the garden needs to ease its way into the winter dormancy

– plant cheerful fall annuals to keep the garden bright

– some of your favorite roses will start to bloom again, make sure they are healthy (we can make an exception about feeding roses, they might not bloom again otherwise). Roses are such wonderful plants that they will bloom through the first frost, long after other perennials have already gone dormant.

– if you don’t already have them, plan on getting some reliable late blooming perennials.

compost

Any healthy, seed free plant material can go in the compost pile. You can also include grass clippings, if you don’t treat your lawn with herbicides. Adding vegetable scraps and eggshells will speed up the process of turning compost into fertile garden soil material, and adding well rotted manure will too. Layering plant material with a matter rich in nitrogen in 6″ layers will provide the optimal compost pile.

Unfortunately, the entire process doesn’t smell or look good, so you might consider a closed system with a wheel so that you can turn the compost without stirring up the smell. These systems are designed to speed up the process too, so you get compost sooner. Also, be courteous to your neighbors and place the system in a remote enough location where it won’t bother anybody.

Tags |

feed and water

On 19, Jun 2010 | 2 Comments | In garden maintenance | By All Year Garden

How much and when?

Feeding: Some people like to compare the synthetic fertilizers with drugs. They have high potency and feed only the plant, which becomes dependent, not the soil, which in time deteriorates and does not replenish its resources to allow plants to thrive. If you have to use fertilizer, try an organic, slow release product twice a year, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Don’t fertilize in the fall, except for newly planted bulbs. Plants need to adjust to going dormant and eating less. Otherwise, the best option for fertilizing would be your home made compost, which turns all your plant waste into a rich, nourishing material resembling top soil. Quick tip:  you can drop plant material in not so visible locations of your flower beds and they will turn to compost without the pile and the smell, enriching the soil in place.

Watering: Some say that watering is a luxury, not a necessity, and the plants, other than the ones in containers, should be able to thrive on the rainwater available that year. I say if the dirt looks dry, water. There is nothing that looks sadder and more neglected than a garden full of wilted plants.

Tags | ,

summer garden pointers

The summer garden has a more tired look than the exuberant garden of spring. It needs a little more care to look its best:

  • make sure to water it often enough (if the plants look wilted or the dirt cracks, it has been too long)
  • keep the plants deadheaded and remove the dead leaves from plants that go dormant after the spring bloom
  • keep the weeds in check, they will sprout out of nowhere and take over if you let them
  • feed the plants for a second wave of bloom
  • wait for fall to move perennials, especially the larger clumps, heat can be very stressful for a transplanted plant.

Tags |