Image Image Image Image Image

@WeeklyGardener tweet of the day:

][just_a_tweet twitteruser=WeeklyGardener]

Follow on Networked Blogs or find the author on Google+

Scroll to Top

To Top

preserves

12

Aug
2011

No Comments

In preserves

By admin

turkish eggplant salad

On 12, Aug 2011 | No Comments | In preserves | By admin

The eggplants finally started producing and they are growing fast. On the northeastern Mediterranean shores August is the month when eggplants are prominently featured on the family table.

This dates back to the time when year round eggplant production and refrigeration wasn’t available, so when the shiny fruit ripened all at the same time, one had to figure out quickly how to cook and preserve it. Since eggplants are very productive, many recipes incorporating them graced Balkan and middle-eastern pantry shelves, providing valuable nutrition for the winter months. The names of traditional eggplant preserves resonate with the flavors and sounds of the countries they originated from: zacusca, moussaka, baba-ganoush, imam bayildi. Some of the flavors may be familiar, others surprise you and make you wonder how you never thought of them before: a pinch of cinnamon or nutmeg completely transforms a ground meat or eggplant dish.

Here is the Turkish eggplant salad recipe. It is served on bread or toast, garnished with chopped parsley and tomato slices.

- 3 medium eggplants

- 1 cup of oil

- 1 onion, chopped

- juice from one lemon

- salt and pepper to taste

Pierce the eggplants with a fork and place them on a grill or in the oven, turning them until the skin is charred evenly and the flesh turns soft. Peel the skins quickly under cold running water. This task is a little tricky, because you have to do it while the eggplants are still hot. Place them on a draining board, salt them freely and get as much of the liquid out of them as possible, to remove bitterness and prevent the salad from becoming runny.

After they are completely cool, mash them with a fork, add the finely chopped onion, the lemon juice and as much salt and pepper as you like. Add the oil at the end, slowly and in small drips, whisking continuously until completely incorporated, then adding some more.  The consistency should be reminiscent of mayonnaise, smooth textured and shiny.

Garnish with tomato slices and parsley and serve on bread.

Do not use a blender. It will smash the seeds and mix their hot bitter juices into the salad.

 

 

 

Submit a Comment

Powered by sweetCaptcha


Optimization WordPress Plugins & Solutions by W3 EDGE