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garden maintenance

persnickety roses

Roses have earned the dubious privilege of being considered sensitive and difficult to grow. This is not entirely true of course, a rose planted in a climate that favors its development requires a lot less maintenance than your average perennial. They do have a list of things they absolutely will not put up with, and whose lack can’t be supplanted by any amount of doting and support. Read more…

stormy weather, sort of…

It is summer already, I think. Certainly feels like it most of the time, which is why the clematis didn’t stay in bloom as long as it usually does.

I spent the last two days waiting for rain, but despite stormy clouds the sky is reluctant to release the water it promised. I can only hope the high humidity in the air will keep the plants from wilting for now. Read more…

spring schedule

After the annuals and veggies are planted, the flower beds cleaned and the perennials spruced up, the roses pruned, the fall blooming plants divided and moved and the summer bulbs planted, one would think that the gardener can sit back with a cup of coffee in some cozy verdant nook and relax. Read more…

rose propagation, rose pruning

The most common method of rose propagation is through stem cuttings. Cut a sturdy, still green stem around six inches long, making sure it has at least five leaves and preferably a spent flower. Bruise the end by crushing it or splitting it lengthwise, dip it in rooting hormone, which can be found at the plant nursery, and stick it in the ground in a location protected from excessive heat or draught. Place a glass jar over it and press it firmly into the soil, making sure no parts of the cutting touch the glass, so that condensation doesn’t encourage mold. Read more…

lavender

Since plant foliage usually doesn’t come in this hue, even for lavender itself, and this is the first time lavender came out of winter looking alive, I didn’t know if this was old growth I should prune or evergreen growth I should leave alone, so I looked up lavender care online. Read more…

chamomile lawns

If you have a sunny slope that is difficult to mow, in a location with well drained, sandy soil, try a chamomile lawn.

The delightful apple scent is a reward in itself, and using chamomile as a groundcover offers some advantages, like low mowing, feeding and watering needs, but the plant is definitely not low maintenance. Read more…

growing fruit trees

Children are usually very excited about growing their own fruit, and even though most urban gardens can’t accommodate an orchard, there are ways to include fruit trees in your landscape. Many of them come in miniature form and can be grown in pots in all but the smallest of spaces, on a patio or a balcony corner. Read more…

cure for the unrelenting blah

In anticipation of good weather I’m already planning some gardening activities, there are summer bulbs to be planted and perennials beds to be cleaned up for spring.

Plodding through day after day bullied by cloudy skies and bone chilling temperatures, I almost forgot how beautiful the garden is, how exhilarating it is to feel it warm up and try to guess the fresh growth right under the soil surface, almost ready to breach it. Read more…

how to grow a wildflower meadow

So, you have your heart set on creating a wildflower meadow and those packages of mixed seeds beckon you from the stands, irresistibly. You picture wild flowers and the thought of perpetual, zero maintenance beauty springs to mind. Wild flower meadows are not low maintenance, at least not for the first five or six years, while they are getting established. Read more…

spring cleaning your perennial garden

Spring cleaning shows off your garden at its best, allowing all the fresh shoots plenty of air and sunlight to develop with amazing speed. Of course if you have a perennial garden Read more…